Columbine, European Columbine, European Crowsfoot, Granny's Bonnets
Aquilegia vulgaris 'Winky Double Red and White'

Family: Ranunculaceae (ra-nun-kew-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aquilegia (a-kwi-LEE-jee-a) (Info)
Species: vulgaris (vul-GAIR-iss) (Info)
Cultivar: Winky Double Red and White
Additional cultivar information:(Winky series)

Category:

Perennials

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Scarlet (Dark Red)

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Blue-Green

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Leandro, California

Des Plaines, Illinois

Olathe, Kansas

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Dearborn Heights, Michigan

Rumson, New Jersey

Raleigh, North Carolina

Fargo, North Dakota

Lansdowne, Pennsylvania

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Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 12, 2015, crayondoom from Fargo, ND (Zone 4a) wrote:

I planted two in the summer of 2014, and it performed okay, but it's leaves turned a deep scarlet and the leaves were getting odd spots on them. I figured it they would probably die over the winter. One is now beautiful, bushy, and has a profusion of flowers. The other is struggling and smaller than it was last year. I will probably shuffle some plants and move the struggling one over.