Calling all "judges" for the annual DG County Fair! Vote for your favorites here!

Thornless Honeylocust 'Rubylace'

Gleditsia triacanthos var. inermis

Family: Caesalpiniaceae (ses-al-pin-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Gleditsia (gleh-DIT-see-uh) (Info)
Species: triacanthos var. inermis
Cultivar: Rubylace
Additional cultivar information:(aka Ruby Lace)

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Burgundy

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round

Height:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By grafting

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Leandro, California

Boise, Idaho

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 27, 2016, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

The new foliage is burgundy, but it quickly fades to a drab olive-brown. The best way to emphasize the new growth is to start with a small whip and pollard it, removing all but 6" of the previous year's growth every year in late winter/early spring. This encourages new growth throughout the growing season.

Cultivars like 'Ruby Lace' are propagated by grafting onto the species. Spiny suckers may emerge from the roots, especially if they're wounded. So a groundcover or a mixture of perennials might be better for underplanting than grass, as mowing may encourage suckering.

This species does not perform well in the clay soils and hot humid summers of the southeastern US. There you may be better off growing the purple-leaf mimosa, Albizia julibrissin 'Summer Chocol... read more

Positive

On Jun 17, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Great looking tree.. not sure if this form is a lot hardier to warm climates than the regular Honey Myrtle, but that one is listed as only growing up to zone 7b... here in zone 9b, bordering on 10a, this tree looks terrific. Great summer color- deep maroon leaves.

BACK TO TOP