Autumn Crocus, Fall Crocus
Crocus laevigatus var. fontenayi

Family: Iridaceae (eye-rid-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Crocus (KROH-kus) (Info)
Species: laevigatus var. fontenayi

Category:

Bulbs

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Blue-Violet

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Variegated

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant is resistant to deer

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Little Rock, Arkansas

Garberville, California

Coos Bay, Oregon

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 2, 2008, pogotree from Coos Bay, OR (Zone 9a) wrote:

Coos Bay, OR
zone 9a
This is a wonderful greek crocus with an unusual blooming period that that bridges the gap between the early spring and late fall species. The foliage emerges in late fall followed soon after by the flowers. For me the blooms have come over a long period of time as opposed to the single flush of flowers from others species that I have grown; So far it has been blooming four weeks since early december and still has more buds showing at the base. The flowers are also nicely scented. It has benefited here from overhead cover to protect it from the heavy winter rains that occur along the oregon coast. Most likely this is a fairly tender plant due to its habit of coming into growth in the middle of winter.