Grassy-leaved Buttercup
Ranunculus gramineus

Family: Ranunculaceae (ra-nun-kew-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ranunculus (ra-NUN-ku-lus) (Info)
Species: gramineus (gram-IN-ee-us) (Info)

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Parker, Colorado

Santaquin, Utah

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Apr 2, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

Hardy at least in Z5-9.

This is a well-behaved clump-former, unlike most buttercups.

Straplike leaves up to 8", flower stems usually 10-12". This is usually summer dormant, with leaves appearing in the fall.

May be propagated by fall division.

In 1993, the Royal Horticultural Society granted this species its coveted Award of Garden Merit.

Positive

On Apr 1, 2015, sladeofsky from Louisville, KY (Zone 6b) wrote:

Hard to find. The Grassy Buttercup makes a good garden plant for edging, the front of border, and Alpine or rock gardens. It is much hardier than listed here. I was just reading an article written by a Wisconsin gardener who has grown it for years.

Positive

On Aug 21, 2011, kjd from Parker, CO wrote:

Not invasive. Bright yellow blossoms in early spring and goes dormant mid-summer. Has grown and proliferated reliably for over 10 years in zone 5.