Mesquite, Kiawe, Algaroba
Prosopis pallida

Family: Mimosaceae
Genus: Prosopis (PROS-oh-pis) (Info)
Species: pallida (PAL-lid-duh) (Info)
Synonym:Prosopis limensis

Category:

Trees

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Nov 25, 2004, caron from Woodland Park, CO (Zone 4b) wrote:

U.S. FEDERALLY LISTED NOXIOUS WEED.
Not allowed for import to the US and not allowed in any interstate or intrastate transportation without a specific permit from USDA APHIS PPQ (Plant Protection and Quarantine).
No one should be selling/growing this plant in the U.S.

Neutral

On Jul 16, 2004, foodiesleuth from Honomu, HI (Zone 11) wrote:

It doesn't grow in my area since we receive a lot of rain and the trees like a more arid climate. Does quite well on the leeward side of the island. One of the honey keepers on the island has extensive collections of hives in kiawe groves. His honey is unique and quite expensive. Naturally opalescent white and thick without any human processing. Best honey in the world!

Neutral

On Jul 15, 2004, punaheledp from Kailua, HI (Zone 11) wrote:

I have been told that "kiawe" was originally brought to Hawaii for catle feed, and it' pods are uses extensively for cattle fodder. It was planted in arid areas for shade and reforestation. However it dessicates an area by using all available water. Deep root systems tap ground water. It grows from sea level to 700m. Although considered a pest plant it has many uses and is locally favored by bee-keepers. Kiawe charcoal is popular for BBQ. It has nasty thorns, and as children, often barefoot, we quickly learned to be cautious aroung these trees.