Cucumber
Cucumis sativus 'Japanese Climbing'

Family: Cucurbitaceae (koo-ker-bih-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cucumis (KOO-koo-mis) (Info)
Species: sativus (sa-TEE-vus) (Info)
Cultivar: Japanese Climbing
» View all varieties of Cucumbers

Category:

Vegetables

Vines and Climbers

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Seed Type:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Bloom Color:

Gold (Yellow-Orange)

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Blooms repeatedly

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Carmel, New York

Quitman, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 10, 2010, dgarden11 from Quitman, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

This was my first year to plant. Very impressed. Heavy producer. Seed germinates quickly in warmed soil. Planted in early spring and although the fruiting has slowed in 100+ temperatures, it is still producing in August. Long vines with tendrils are trained vertically on string trellis. Highly recommend for NE Texas.

Positive

On Aug 12, 2008, Sequee from Carmel, NY (Zone 6b) wrote:

I received these seeds from my DG friend oldseed, who RAVED about the cukes he was getting from his plants. I have to agree! Very tasy and very prolific!!!

Neutral

On Feb 27, 2007, berrygirl from Braselton, GA (Zone 7b) wrote:

Light green fruits are 7-9" long by 3" diameter and are produced all season. 58-65 days.

Neutral

On Aug 19, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

The Eastern Native Seeds Conservacy describes as: "Listed by Thorburn in 1892 and introduced from Japan around that time. Strong grasping tendrils make these ideal for putting on trellises, hence the name. Fruits fairly shaped, somewhat long 6-8 inches. Rare."