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Japanese Morning Glory
Ipomoea nil 'Candy Pink'

Family: Convolvulaceae (kon-volv-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ipomoea (ip-oh-MEE-a) (Info)
Species: nil (nil) (Info)
Cultivar: Candy Pink

Category:

Annuals

Vines and Climbers

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Dundee, Ohio

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 20, 2005, RON_CONVOLVULACEAE from Netcong, NJ (Zone 5b) wrote:

The Original "Candy Pink" has flowers that are a very definite Pink,and are not wine colored or red...the throats should be a solid pink,with no white showing.
The seeds of "Candy Pink" are a beige color and definitely not brown or black.
The plant very much resembles the True Old type Scarlett O'Hara ,but is a rich pink,instead of Red.

Positive

On Aug 24, 2004, OhioBreezy from Dundee, OH (Zone 5b) wrote:

First time growing this and I am delighted with the amount and color of this vine. Seeding heavily now. First introduced in 1955 by Harold Decker.