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Gray five eyes
Chamaesaracha coniodes

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Chamaesaracha (kam-ay-sar-AWK-uh) (Info)
Species: coniodes

Category:

Perennials

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Silver/Gray

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Antonio, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 22, 2007, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

Gray Five Eyes (Chamaesaracha coniodes or conioides) is also known as gray false nightshade, ground saracha and prostrate ground-cherry. It is a native plant that is found in Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. A low, reclining plant, it is typically densely hairy and emerges from a woody rhizome. It is sticky to the touch due to glandular hairs on its foliage. Its leaves are up to 2 1/8 inches long and 3/4 inch wide, wavy, shallowly toothed to deeply lobed. It produces1/2 inch wide white to pale yellow to yellowish-green blooms that have darker stripes from the center to the rim. The petals are sometimes tinged with purple on the outer edges of the lobes. It produces white fruit.

Neutral

On Sep 4, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This plant is a U.S. native and grows "wild" in TX, CO, KS, NM and OK.