Giant Gum, Mountain Ash, Swamp Gum
Eucalyptus regnans

Family: Myrtaceae (mir-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Eucalyptus (yoo-kuh-LIP-tus) (Info)
Species: regnans
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

, British Columbia

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 11, 2013, tsb_cw from Ballarat
Australia wrote:

E.regnans is the Mountain Ash, the king of the eucalypts for it has been recorded to grow over 100m (well over 300 feet). E.ovata (Swamp Gum) is a smaller tree to about 20-30m only. Both will cope with high water volumes, the swamp gum comfortably being inundated for months (hence 'swamp' in the name), while the E.regnans typically grows as a temperate rainforest tree (eg Otway Ranges, Healesville) where rainfall can be up to 1000mm (40 inches). Very different trees in many respects.

Neutral

On Apr 21, 2006, gooley from Hawthorne, FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have seeds for this tree but haven't planted any yet; supposedly it is rather more cold tolerant than zone 9b. I'm in 8b and I'll see if that's true. Eucalyptus in north Florida can be tricky, what with sudden hard freezes after a warm week in winter (this is why late-flowering fruit and nut trees are often the best choices here: the pecan is a prime example).