Santa Rosa Fern
Aglaomorpha coronans

Family: Polypodiaceae
Genus: Aglaomorpha (ag-lay-oh-MOR-fuh) (Info)
Species: coronans (kor-OH-nans) (Info)
Synonym:Pseudodrynaria coronans
Synonym:Drynaria coronans
Synonym:Phymatodes coronans
Synonym:Pleopeltis coronans
Synonym:Polypodium coronans

Category:

Ferns

Epiphytes

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From spores

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Clayton, California

Hayward, California

Long Beach, California

Stockton, California

Brandon, Florida

Miami, Florida

Naples, Florida

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

4
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Feb 28, 2015, hornemadness from Long Beach, CA wrote:

Though frequently listed as an aglaomorpha, this plant is an intergeneric hybrid between aglaomorpha coronata and drynaria quercufolia. An alternate appellation for this fern is aglaodrynaria robertsii.

Positive

On Sep 2, 2008, BayAreaTropics from Hayward, CA wrote:

Vastly underused fern in the bay area. Strong grower with thick fronds. In three years mine has grown fronds that were about 16" ~close to 4'. Hardy to 30f with no damage. And, is resistent to slugs and snails somewhat. Regular fertilizing and strong lighting will push the big growth. One of the big three epyphitic ferns for tree mounting along with Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum.
Not easy to find and that's a shame, as one of these mounted in a tree with the other's would be as jungly as you can get.

Neutral

On Mar 24, 2007, Cretaceous from El Sobrante, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

This fen is native to Vietnam.

Positive

On Nov 30, 2006, charliwolf from West Blocton, AL (Zone 7b) wrote:

We sell this plant at the nursery where I work. I own one and have found that if you allow it to dry between waterings, thatit will drop fronds. Otherwise very easy to grow, Good plant for beginners, grows relatively quickly, likes to be slighly root bound, and does well hanging. Very unusual to look at. Very good pic at exoticangels.com - which is where our company gets ours.

Positive

On Sep 8, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Attractive epiphytic fern- commonly used for hanging baskets and wall/tree mounts in warmer areas of Southern California. Has long, leather leaves with wide leaflets. Rhizomes are highly ornamental as they are so thick and fuzzy (up to 1" thick).