Lombardy Poplar
Populus nigra 'Italica'

Family: Salicaceae (sal-i-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Populus (POP-yoo-lus) (Info)
Species: nigra (NY-gruh) (Info)
Cultivar: Italica

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Silver/Gray

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Flagstaff, Arizona

Denison, Iowa

Falmouth, Kentucky

Falling Waters, West Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Jul 15, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

This narrow columnar cultivar of the Black Popular from Europe used to be planted a good amount in northern Illinois as a screen in the 1950's to 70's. It has been susceptible to canker disease that usually kills it when about 15 years old, and has been dropped in much of the humid East USA. Out in the drier West, it does much better without the canker disease.

Positive

On Jul 18, 2008, lkz5ia from Denison, IA (Zone 5b) wrote:

Lombardy grows fast here, but has short lifespan that averages out to 15 years. The lifespan can be extended if pollarded. A couple of my lombardy poplars were nearing the end of their life and I reinvigorated them by cutting them down to the stumps, and also caused some root sprouting to occur.

This poplar has a very narrow stature, and if one has the space for it, its worth growing.