American Wild Carrot
Daucus pusillus

Family: Apiaceae (ay-pee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Daucus (DO-kus) (Info)
Species: pusillus (pus-ILL-us) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Herbs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Boerne, Texas

Lipan, Texas

San Antonio, Texas

Santo, Texas

Falling Waters, West Virginia

Menasha, Wisconsin

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Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 28, 2007, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

American wild carrot (Daucus pusillus) is also known as rattlesnake weed and southwestern Carrot and is a plant that grows natively in many states. It is considered a noxious weed by many.

In Texas, it can be found growing in the South Texas Plains and the Edwards Plateau regions on barrens, meadows, plains, dry hills, roadsides, streambanks and waste areas. It is not picky about soil types. Simple to few-branched and erect, it grows 2 to 3 feet tall and its roots have a characteristic carrot odor. The leaves are fern-like and lacy (alternate, pinnate and compound). The stems are retrorsely-hispid (covered in rigid or bristly hairs that are directed back or downwards). The leaves are eaten by white-tailed deer.

It blooms March or April through June/July... read more

Neutral

On May 28, 2007, bigcityal from Menasha, WI (Zone 5a) wrote:

Basically a roadside weed for this part of the world. The flowers are interesting to watch open, but in a garden setting it will seed itself everywhere and the long taproot make it hard to pull out.