Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Brunfelsia grandiflora

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brunfelsia (brun-FELZ-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: grandiflora (gran-dih-FLOR-uh) (Info)



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)


6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)


USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade


Seed is poisonous if ingested

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:


White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Late Fall/Early Winter

Mid Winter




Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:


Clovis, California

Larkspur, California

Long Beach, California

Napa, California

Brooksville, Florida

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Hobe Sound, Florida

Jacksonville, Florida (2 reports)

Miami, Florida

Niceville, Florida

Port Charlotte, Florida

Saint Petersburg, Florida

Sebring, Florida

Seffner, Florida

Tampa, Florida (3 reports)

Webster, Florida

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana

Austin, Texas

Mcallen, Texas

Port Neches, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:


On Aug 6, 2012, troplady from Kahului, HI wrote:

Because I love the blooms on this plant I planted 2. The plants are healthy and growing butwon't bloom. Our soil is sandy ( Hawaii). they have been in the ground about 8 months. I have seen them bloom here at a higher elevation and no sandy soil. Anyone know a fertilizer I could use or some way to encourage them to bloom?


On Jan 9, 2010, birdstalker from Hobe Sound, FL wrote:

LOVE the tricolored blooms. Have not noticed a significant scent; however, it is planted near the street where our neighbors benefit the most. Looks lovely against the yellow back drop of our house. Our YTT is a small tree form, which works nicely to screen the garage windows.

It does beautifully in the shady northern exposure. Fast grower. This year it seemed to pop blooms all at once on Thanksgiving day. The leaves go through a transition during the summer, but it rewards us with blooms all winter ~ a real treat.


On Apr 9, 2005, eileenelder from Seffner, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

This plant reseeds itself. When I purchased my home I had two huge 13+ foot shrubs. I now have these growing amongst all of my shrubs. I finally today started removing some, it broke my heart - I LOVE this shrub. The flowers are beautiful, the smell wafts around my house all day.

I have just started new plants from cutting the new stem growth and sticking them into soil and watering. It does takes sometime (weeks) for the roots to take. I have also started several in small pots to share with family. I also planted seeds - I opened dried seed pods. I will watch these carefully, but they will take about 3 months.


On Oct 6, 2004, Jamespayne from Sebring, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

I purchased a Brunfelsia grandiflora early last Spring 2004, and now in the Fall of 2004 it has grown 4 times it's size, reaching a height of over 4 feet and still putting out new growth. It was in bloom when I purchased the plant, and I can not wait to see the flowers change on this plant now that is is much larger. It survived 3 major hurricanes with little damage!


On Sep 12, 2004, Monocromatico from Rio de Janeiro
Brazil (Zone 11) wrote:

South American shrub, very similar to other Brunfelsias, just the flowers being significantly bigger, plus some minor foliar characteristics.

The flowers on this species are not so abundant as in other Yesterday-today-and-tomorrows, but like them, they show up mainly on winter. They open featuring a lavender color with a white gut, turning white with a brown gut in the second day. The first day flowers are very aromatic.