Fraser Fir, Southern Balsam Fir, Southern Fir
Abies fraseri

Family: Pinaceae (py-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Abies (A-bees) (Info)
Species: fraseri (FRAY-zer-ee) (Info)
Synonym:Pinus fraseri

Category:

Herbs

Trees

Conifers

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

By grafting

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Rehoboth Beach, Delaware

Aurora, Illinois

Honey Brook, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 21, 2013, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

A very handsome conifer native to the Appalachians and a very popular Christmas tree due to its retaining its needles so well, plus they are soft and fragrant. The few I saw around in landscapes in the Chicago area grew very poorly or just alright, depending. It does not like lots of heat, drought and strong winds. I found two good landscape specimens in a landscape in a sheltered area in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. I also found 5 planted in a natural park called Strubel Lake Park in southeast PA doing well in full sun. It differs from the very similar Balsam Fir by having reflexed bracts on the cones longer than the scales, the needles are a little thicker on the twigs and can be a little shorter to 0.4 " long to 1" long. It can be as fragrant as the Balsam species or only slightly fragrant... read more

Neutral

On Nov 9, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

Evergreen tree which can reach 40'. Shape is like a pyramid. It is a slow grower.

Bark is smooth and dark green when young. This tree prefers moist, well-drained loamy soil. Prefers cooler climates, too. As with many other fir trees, the deer love this one, too.