Eight Petal Mountain-avens
Dryas octopetala

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Dryas (DRY-ass) (Info)
Species: octopetala (ock-toh-PET-uh-luh) (Info)

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 2b: to -42.7 C (-45 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Evergreen

Dark/Black

Veined

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Anchorage, Alaska

Nome, Alaska

Vancouver, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 23, 2010, jtellerelsberg from Norwich, VT (Zone 5a) wrote:

According to the book Edible Forest Gardens, Vol. 2, by Jacke and Toensmeier, Dryas octopetala is an actinorhizal nitrogen fixer and also usable for tea (though they don't say what part of the plant to use). Actinomycetes, the bacteria that fix nitrogen when living symbiotically with the plant's roots, are ubiquitous in soils so you don't need to use any inoculant for this or other actinorhizal plants.

Positive

On Dec 16, 2004, Todd_Boland from St. John's, NL (Zone 5b) wrote:

A wonderful alpine for the rockery or as a groundcover in a sunny site. The plant is native to alpine and sub-alpine areas of western North America where they colour the slopes creamy-white in early summer. After they fade, lovely silvery plume-like seeds develop adding to their attraction later in the season. They prefer lime soils that are well drained yet not droughty.

Neutral

On Sep 15, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This plant is a U.S. native and grows mainly in the Pacific Northwest.