Triumph Tulip
Tulipa 'Prinses Irene'

Family: Liliaceae (lil-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tulipa (TOO-li-pa) (Info)
Cultivar: Prinses Irene
Additional cultivar information:(aka Princess Irene)
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Division:

Division 3 - Triumph

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Coral/Apricot

Orange

Purple

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Flowers are fragrant

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Flowers are good for cutting

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Luis Obispo, California

Clifton, Colorado

Dallas, Georgia

Divernon, Illinois

Hubbard, Iowa

Barbourville, Kentucky

Ewing, Kentucky

Revere, Massachusetts

Santa Fe, New Mexico

, Ontario

Salem, Oregon

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Norristown, Pennsylvania

Anacortes, Washington

Martinsburg, West Virginia

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Apr 9, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This is fine if you want an annual, but it's not a good naturalizer or perennial, at least in my climate (Boston Z6a). Lasts only 2-3 years in the garden, if you keep summer irrigation to a minimum, growing smaller every year. (Tulips require a dry summer rest, and here we get too much summer rainfall for most tulips to perennialize. Most irrigated gardens here are too moist for tulips to survive even one summer.)

All tulips are prime fodder for deer and other critters.

Introduced in 1949.

Positive

On Dec 7, 2008, jmorth from Divernon, IL (Zone 5b) wrote:

Short stature makes it a fine forecable tulip for winter enjoyment.