Black Cohosh, Black Snakeroot, Fairy Candles
Actaea racemosa 'Black Negligee'

Family: Ranunculaceae (ra-nun-kew-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Actaea (ak-TEE-uh) (Info)
Species: racemosa (ray-see-MO-suh) (Info)
Cultivar: Black Negligee
Synonym:Cimicifuga racemosa

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Bardstown, Kentucky

Plainfield, New Jersey

Pittsford, New York

Southold, New York

Delta, Ohio

Kalama, Washington

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Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 12, 2007, berrygirl from Braselton, GA (Zone 7b) wrote:

CIMICIFUGA - SWEET BUGBANE “BLACK NEGLIGEE”
Description from FlowerScent Gardens catalog: (Cimicifuga ramosa) Grow in shade to partial sun, moist soil. Height is 3’ tall and is hardy from zones 3 to 9 - Space 1 foot apart. This shady perennial usually does not have a fragrance but this variety has quite a lot of it! The perfume can be detected yards away on a quiet late summer or early fall day. In her book called “Fragrance in Bloom” by Ann Lovejoy, she describes the perfume as “...a strong and carrying scent rather like clover and honey.” For my nose the strong scent has more of a ‘warm’, sweet and subtle licorice aroma. The light pink to white flowers are very small but arranged up a towering spike resembling 'bottle brushes' which happens to be the generic nickname of this sple... read more