Dutch Hyacinth
Hyacinthus orientalis 'Chestnut Flower'

Family: Hyacinthaceae
Genus: Hyacinthus (hy-uh-SIN-thus) (Info)
Species: orientalis (or-ee-en-TAY-liss) (Info)
Cultivar: Chestnut Flower
Registered or introduced: 1880

Category:

Bulbs

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Blue-Green

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant is resistant to deer

Flowers are good for cutting

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Garberville, California

Los Altos, California

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Aug 3, 2006, chrisw99 from Los Altos, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

Hyacinthus orientalis 'Chestnut Flower' is a lovely light pink double with slightly darker center stripes. It is shorter than many other hyacinths, but the color and the frilly double flowers certainly make it stand out. This is a very old fashioned flower introduced in 1880 by D. Baaker.

I grow it in my Zone 9 garden where it has repeated for 3 years. I let it go completely dry during the summer.

Positive

On Sep 24, 2004, ladyrowan from Garberville, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

Dense spikes of soft pink double florets with a tiny darker pink accent in the middle of each petal.