Peltoboykinia, Yawato-so
Peltoboykinia tellimoides

Family: Saxifragaceae (saks-ih-frag-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Peltoboykinia (pel-toh-boy-KIN-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: tellimoides
Synonym:Boykinia tellimoides

Category:

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Red

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Townsend, Massachusetts

Chesterland, Ohio

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jan 10, 2008, Fledgeling from Huron, SD wrote:

The species is a clump forming perennial. A handsome shade plant with large long-stalked leaves. The abundant flowers that arise in summer are bell-shaped flowers with narrow cream to yellow petals that give a generous display on established clumps. For the moist shaded woodland garden in a fertile but well-drained position. Propagate by seed or division in spring. Uncommon in cultivation, its hardiness limits are somewhat untested, but is known to be hardy to atleast 14F.


Peltoboykinia is listed as a rare plant on the red list. The name Peltoboykinia refers to the plants distinctive shield shaped leaf ( peltate) and the assumed close relationship to the genus Boykinia. However the similarities are now known to be superficial; the plants are only distantly relate... read more