Larkspur-leaf Monkshood
Aconitum delphinifolium

Family: Ranunculaceae (ra-nun-kew-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aconitum (a-kon-EYE-tum) (Info)
Species: delphinifolium (del-fin-uh-FOLE-ee-um) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Medium Blue

Dark Blue

Blue-Violet

Violet/Lavender

Purple

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Dark/Black

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is resistant to deer

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Unalaska, Alaska

Kennebunk, Maine

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jan 28, 2005, JodyC from Palmyra, IL (Zone 5b) wrote:

Aconite poison contains an alkaloid, which paralyzes the nervous system and lowers both body temperature and blood pressure. Whalers used it to immobilize whales. They smeared the poison on the tips of whaling lances, which were thrust into the side or the tail of an animal. The poison did not kill the whale immediately, it acted over several days to paralyze it and it eventually drowned. With luck, the carcass would float to shore, providing food for the community.