Leek
Allium porrum 'Giant Musselburg'

Family: Alliaceae
Genus: Allium (AL-ee-um) (Info)
Species: porrum (POH-rum) (Info)
Cultivar: Giant Musselburg
Additional cultivar information:(aka Giant Musselburgh)
Registered or introduced: 1834
Synonym:Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum
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Category:

Biennials

Vegetables

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Evergreen

Herbaceous

Blue-Green

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are good for drying and preserving

Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Clovis, California

Sun City, California

Portland, Oregon

Wilsonville, Oregon

Fabens, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 10, 2010, lehua_mc from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

So, a little known fact about Leeks is that they are *perennial*. I planted mine in an ornamental bed expecting to have food the first fall & winter with flowers the second year. I did allow them to grow too close together (pay attention to the spacing recommendations!), so their roots knit a fast bond in the soil. I had to use a hori-hori knife to cut them out! Everyone thought I was harvesting the plants for too long, and the conventional knowledge was that I should have thrown them to the compost heap much earlier. Well, I just kept an eye on them, and stopped harvesting only when they showed signs of sending up a vertical flower stalk. Apparently they will die back in fall after they flower, but then come back as an edible crop year after year if I don't pull out the roots, propagating... read more

Neutral

On Mar 1, 2007, berrygirl from Braselton, GA (Zone 7b) wrote:

Enormous size, 9-15" long by 2-3" in diameter. Good buncher; 80-150 days from transplant.

Neutral

On Sep 27, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

Introduced in 1834, this popular Scottish leek is known for its large, fat, tender stalks, mild flavor, and overwintering capabilities. It does well in the North or South.