Bahama Nightshade, Cankerberry, Key West Nightshade
Solanum bahamense

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Solanum (so-LAN-num) (Info)
Species: bahamense (ba-ha-MEN-see) (Info)

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Violet/Lavender

Bloom Time:

Blooms all year

Foliage:

Evergreen

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Big Pine Key, Florida

Fort Pierce, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 11, 2012, scbentz from Cold Spring, KY wrote:

Saw copious growth of this lovely plant at Bahia Honda State Park. (June 2012)

Positive

On Oct 3, 2004, NativePlantFan9 from Boca Raton, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

This is a large shrub with clusters of beautiful violet/lavender star-shaped flowers native to the tropical hardwood hammocks of coastal South Florida and the Keys. The scarlet-red, flaming berries probably provide food for wildlife such as birds, and the flowers probably attract butterflies. A great plant if you live in zone 10a along the Gulf or Atlantic side of Florida or southward!

MORE FACTS - Member of Nightshade (Potato) Family, Solanaceae. (Credits to ISB Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants and Wikipeda, The Free Encyclopedia).