Hedge Bamboo
Bambusa multiplex 'Golden Goddess'

Family: Poaceae (poh-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Bambusa (bam-BOO-suh) (Info)
Species: multiplex (MUL-tih-pleks) (Info)
Cultivar: Golden Goddess

Category:

Ornamental Grasses and Bamboo

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Anniston, Alabama

Tucson, Arizona

Fallbrook, California

Moraga, California

Vista, California

New Port Richey, Florida

Okatie, South Carolina

Austin, Texas

Elgin, Texas

Granbury, Texas

Buckley, Washington

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 13, 2007, Suze_ from (Zone 7b) wrote:

So far, I'm impressed with 'Golden Goddess', and it seems to do well here in my climate. Last fall, I planted several plants along the perimeter of my property as privacy "hedgerows". Plants are already 6-7 feet tall, and thickening up nicely.

Last year, we had a hard winter here (relatively speaking) shortly after I got the plants in. They did lose some leaves, even though all of the culms ended up being just fine, and put out new leaves in the spring. Plants are much more hardy once established (so I've been told) and I don't expect to see much, if any, winter leaf loss in the future.

The reason I went with this variety is that my research indicated it is one of the few clumping varieties in this size range that will take the Texas sun and heat, and yet ... read more