Korean Boxwood
Buxus sinica var. insularis

Family: Buxaceae
Genus: Buxus (BUK-sus) (Info)
Species: sinica var. insularis
Synonym:Buxus microphylla var. koreana

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Chartreuse (Yellow-Green)

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Aromatic

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Provides winter interest

This plant is resistant to deer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Cherry Valley, Illinois

Lisle, Illinois

North Dartmouth, Massachusetts

Cincinnati, Ohio

Painesville, Ohio

Prosperity, South Carolina

Fort Worth, Texas

Richmond, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jul 19, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

The straight species of Korean Boxwood I learned as being Buxus microphylla koreana, in the 1970's. It was the first boxwood to be successfully grown in the Chicago area of USDA Zone 5a in the 1970's. Its great disadvantage was that it would discolor in winter in the North and not be a real evergreen as the color turned green & yellow & brown. This mother species is not sold much anymore from northern nurseries because of its browning in winter. A large number of cultivars and a number of hybrids between this and the Common Boxwood from Europe are now used.

Positive

On Aug 11, 2011, BUFFY690 from Prosperity, SC (Zone 7b) wrote:

I love my Korean Boxwoods, hoping to be able to propagate a few more from these specimens, for a couple other places in the yard as well as a few large containers.
very controlled growing habit (I keep them rounded) very eyecatching foilage all seasons.

Neutral

On Mar 16, 2007, berrygirl from Braselton, GA (Zone 7b) wrote:

Buxus sinica (microph.) insularis DWF. KOREAN BOXWOOD EG (z5) (Bon,Fra)
Among the hardiest of boxwoods, this dwarf shrub (2'to 2 1/2') has a spreading habit and small dark-green leaves. PSh/Med.