Japanese Toad Lily
Tricyrtis 'Hatatogisa'

Family: Liliaceae (lil-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tricyrtis (try-SER-tis) (Info)
Cultivar: Hatatogisa

Category:

Perennials

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Medium Blue

Dark Blue

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Leandro, California

Natick, Massachusetts

Dearborn Heights, Michigan

Leesburg, Virginia

Lexington, Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Aug 19, 2007, DCB_YMQ from Montreal, QC (Zone 5a) wrote:

Beware of squirrels! Had mine one day only as the squirrels not only ate the flower but the whole plant as well - including roots!

Neutral

On Aug 15, 2005, MnK from Paris, ON (Zone 5b) wrote:

I just purchased this plant from Heritage Perennials (June 2005) and the label lists the name as "Tricyrtis formosana 'Seiryu' " . On the back of the plant tag it states FORMERLY HATATOGISA. Just a FYI. Can't wait for the blooms to open on mine!

Positive

On Oct 8, 2004, fangNJ from New Providence, NJ (Zone 6a) wrote:

Delicate, orchidlike, deep dusty blue flowers have a white center and contrasting purple spots. The flower rise above the foliage on long, arching stems.
Perfect for shaded sites along a walk or path.
Divide in early spring while plants are still dormant.