Willow-leaf Cotoneaster
Cotoneaster salicifolius

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cotoneaster (kot-on-ee-ASS-ter) (Info)
Species: salicifolius (sal-iss-ih-FOH-lee-us) (Info)

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Dark/Black

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Oxford, Connecticut

Royston, Georgia

Roslindale, Massachusetts

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 22, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This species is familiar here (Boston MA Z6a) from the ubiquitous landscaping cultivars, which are low weeping evergreen shrubs widely used as groundcovers. The species is generally a large shrub or small multistemmed tree as much as 15' tall, and is unaccountably neglected in the US, but more commonly appreciated in the gardens of Europe.

The evergreen leaves are glossy and deep green in summer, acquiring dark purple tones in winter.

The May-June flower display is attractive but not overwhelming. As with all cotoneasters, the flowers are malodorous, like a pyracantha or a callery pear.

The profuse showy scarlet fruit mature in September-October and generally remain ornamental into the winter, eventually to be eaten by birds once they begin to ... read more