Rape
Brassica napus var. oleifera

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brassica (BRAS-ee-ka) (Info)
Species: napus var. oleifera

Category:

Vegetables

Groundcovers

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Bartow, Florida

Augusta, Georgia

Troy, Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 30, 2005, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

Accidently got plants in with collard plants. We could tell in just a few weeks that these were more vigorous, and the leaves had tiny stickers on the backside. Their flavor and leaf texture was different from any other greens we had ever grown.
Flavorwise, I would never intentionally plant them because I didn't care for the flavor.
MN4

Positive

On Oct 11, 2004, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

This is the older generic cultivar of rape, which is used for winter cover crops, and green manure. In my youth we planted it for winter hog pasture. It is edible and similar to a smooth leaf kale in taste and texture, We use to eat it when other greens played out and the kale became infested with plant lice (aphids). This is the cultivar used for rape seed oil. In the 1970's an improved cultivar was developed in Canada called Canola and is used for Canola oil.