Burning Bush, Cork Bush, Winged Euonymus 'Monstrosus'

Euonymus alatus

Family: Celastraceae
Genus: Euonymus (yoo-ON-ih-mus) (Info)
Species: alatus (a-LAY-tus) (Info)
Cultivar: Monstrosus
Synonym:Celastrus alatus
Synonym:Euonymus alata



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)


8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)


USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade


Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:


Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer


Grown for foliage


Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

4.6 to 5.0 (highly acidic)

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:


Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Valparaiso, Indiana

Belchertown, Massachusetts

East Tawas, Michigan

Austin, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:


On Feb 24, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

On this cultivar, the ornamental corky wings on the stems are much wider than on the species. In other respects, including its invasiveness, it's much like the species.

Import, trade, sale, purchase, and planting this species is illegal in my state and one other. This plant invades and degrades natural areas in eastern and midwestern North America. I often encounter this in wild areas, with seedlings sometimes carpeting the ground in woodlands.

Birds eat the fruit and may deposit the seeds many miles away. Your plant doesn't need to be near a wild area to spread its offspring there.


On May 8, 2012, plant_it from Valparaiso, IN wrote:

If you live in the U.S., it's a non-native invasive. Prior homeowner planted them and they're spreading into my bordering woodlands. Do not plant if you live near woodlands. Plant a native version like black chokecherry instead.