Western sunflower
Helianthus anomalus

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Helianthus (hee-lee-AN-thus) (Info)
Species: anomalus (ah-NOM-uh-lus) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Foliage:

Chartreuse/Yellow

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Queen Creek, Arizona

Merced, California

Roswell, New Mexico

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jun 2, 2008, stephanotis from Queen Creek, AZ (Zone 8b) wrote:

These are prolific weeds where I live in Arizona. Anywhere there is a little bit of water and recently tilled ground these spring up, getting to over 6' tall. They tend to group near fields that get irrigation, or vacant lots after rain. They are also ant magnets, and everytime I have gotten close to one of these I see thousands of ants running up and down the prickly stems. Also the stems get extremely woody and tough when mature, and if you want to cut one down you either run over it with a tractor, or chop it with an ax. Cute flowers, but I'm not sure I would plant this on purpose in my garden. I'm guessing the seeds are spread by birds and wind, and they self sow more than freely.

Neutral

On Aug 30, 2007, ladyannne from Merced, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

These sprung up in my herb garden. While lovely, they do take over. Terribly prolific, and easily over six feet tall. Removing them so the herbs get sun might be a task in the coming years.