Coastal tarweed
Hemizonia corymbosa

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Hemizonia (hem-ih-ZOH-nee-uh) (Info)
Species: corymbosa (kor-rim-BOW-suh) (Info)

Category:

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Height:

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Spacing:

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Hardiness:

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Sun Exposure:

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Danger:

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Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

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Other details:

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Soil pH requirements:

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Patent Information:

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Propagation Methods:

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Seed Collecting:

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Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Richmond, California

Saratoga, California

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
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negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 27, 2006, CApoppy from Santa Cruz Mountains, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

The common name, tarweed, is appropriate to this resinous plant that leaves your hands feeling sticky after you have touched it. It has a pungent, but not unpleasant, odor. This native self sows in our coastal mountain setting, but it is not difficult to pull unwanted volunteers.

Although it has a rather unkempt appearance, tarweed provides a welcome spot of color in August and September when most of our other wildflowers have long ceased blooming. The other notable exception is California fuschia, (once classified as Zauschneria, recently reclassified as Epilobium). Tarweed and California fuschia together make a pleasant scene with the fuschia mounding in front, its scarlet flowers hiding the scruffy lower foliage of the tarweed.

The sunflower-like petals on... read more