Myrtle
Myrtus communis 'Compacta'

Family: Myrtaceae (mir-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Myrtus (MER-tus) (Info)
Species: communis (KOM-yoo-nis) (Info)
Cultivar: Compacta

Category:

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Tucson, Arizona (2 reports)

Chula Vista, California

Crockett, California

Newbury Park, California

North Fork, California

Seaside, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 19, 2012, Tunnelmotor from Picture Rocks, AZ wrote:

If you want a lush, green shrub in the desert, compacta is hard to beat. I'm surprised I don't see it used more often. I have three established plants that do well with one deep irrigation each month in summer. Two others, which are larger, receive a deep soaking just a couple of times each summer. Shallow, frequent irrigation results in the plants beginning to turn yellow. Needs little or no fertilizer. One plant has thrived against an eastern wall that gets direct sun throughout the mornings/early afternoons. I like the natural form they take on with age, but I prune back one plant once a year because it tries to take over a stepping-stone area.

Neutral

On Nov 23, 2008, Calif_Sue from Northern California
United States (Zone 9a) wrote:

AKA: Dwarf Sweet Myrtle. It takes pruning well and is suitable for hedges, topiaries and containers.