Yellow False Acacia, Black Locust, Yellow Locust
Robinia pseudoacacia 'Semperflorens'

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Robinia (roh-BIN-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: pseudoacacia (soo-doh-a-KAY-see-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Semperflorens

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
1
negative
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 9, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This cultivar has a second bloom in August-September, so it's effectively in bloom much of the summer. It's said to have few or no thorns on its branches. Less prone to wind damage than the species due to its more open branching. It's a very popular street and park tree in Germany.

This is not considered invasive in the southwestern US, where it's a tough, moderately xeric landscape tree.

Black locust is often considered invasive through much of eastern and midwestern North America where it's been planted outside its native range, especially in open scrub-pine/oak woodlands with low-fertility sandy soils. It tends to form spreading colonies by root suckering. The suckering can become problematic in gardens.

Negative

On Mar 15, 2008, distantkin from Saint Cloud, MN (Zone 4b) wrote:

Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is considered invasive by the Minnesota DNR
"Ecological Threat:

* Invades primarily disturbed habitats, degraded wood, thickets and old fields crowding out native vegetation of prairies, oak savannas and upland forests, forming single species stands.
* It reproduces vigorously by root suckering and stump sprouting forming a common connecting root system.
* It is native to the U.S. and occurs naturally on the lower Appalachian mountain slopes. It has been extensively planted for its nitrogen-fixing qualities and its hard wood."