Wintercreeper Euonymus 'Silver Queen'

Euonymus fortunei

Family: Celastraceae
Genus: Euonymus (yoo-ON-ih-mus) (Info)
Species: fortunei (for-TOO-nee-eye) (Info)
Cultivar: Silver Queen
Synonym:Euonymus fortunei var. radicans
Synonym:Euonymus radicans
Synonym:Euonymus japonicus var. acutus
Synonym:Euonymus japonicus var. chinensis
Synonym:Euonymus japonicus var. radicans




Vines and Climbers

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers


24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)


USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade


All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Green

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer


Grown for foliage




Provides winter interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mount Sterling, Kentucky

Valley Lee, Maryland

Wilmington, North Carolina

Westmoreland, Tennessee

Gardeners' Notes:


On Mar 16, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

Like all cultivars of this species, it frequently sports to other forms. These forms need to be cut out when they appear, as they can outcompete the original cultivar.

I gave up planting this species before I realized its invasive potential, because I see so many plantings infested and disfigured or even killed by euonymus scale.

Once established, this species can be very difficult to get rid of. It's resistant to most herbicides, and regrows from small pieces of root.

It is naturalized in most of the eastern and central states. The US Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Nature Conservancy, and other organizations concerned with the preservation of natural areas in North America all have expressed concern about the invasive impact of ... read more


On Nov 9, 2004, philomel from Castelnau RB Pyrenes
France (Zone 8a) wrote:

This is a real favourite of mine
It will grow in dry shade, gradually making a large shrub, but will take pruning well. If placed against a wall it will start to cling with aerial roots in the manner of ivy once established.

The flowers are white, not outstanding perhaps although quite pretty, but very attractive to bees and hoverflies, so you will be in no doubt when it is flowering for the constant humming around it.

One of the joys of summer.
Birds also find it good cover for roosting and nesting.