Two-flower Dwarf Dandelion

Krigia biflora

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Krigia (KRIG-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: biflora (by-FLOR-uh) (Info)



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)


3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)


USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall



Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Benton, Kentucky

Erie, Michigan

Cole Camp, Missouri

Piedmont, Missouri

Gardeners' Notes:


On May 18, 2005, Toxicodendron from Piedmont, MO (Zone 6a) wrote:

A pretty wildflower, not real invasive like regular dandelions. Very shallowly rooted, so it is easy to remove if not wanted. The leaves and flowers are similar to dandelions, but smaller.
This can be identified by the clasping leaf on the stem. A similar wildflower, Hawkweed, does not have the clasping leaf.
Although the term biflora indicates two flowers, the plants usually bear more than that.