Mountain Ash

Sorbus pohuashanensis

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sorbus (sor-bus) (Info)
Species: pohuashanensis (po-hew-uh-shan-EN-sis) (Info)



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)


15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)


USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer


Grown for foliage



Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

By grafting

By budding

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Oakdale, Tennessee

Gardeners' Notes:


On May 9, 2006, Crowman from Oakdale, TN wrote:

Plants grow somewhat slowly the first couple of years, then growth accelerates. I have had to battle deer and woodchuck (by far the worst) to keep foliage on the young plants. I finally had to stake metal wire cages around the plants less than 4 feet tall and then wrapped deer guard around the tops. I have 6 trees and all will be over 6 feet in height by year end. The tallest is the one that has received the most sun and the fewest animal attacks. It stands at least 12 feet. The trees are entering year 4 of their growth. I expect blossoms in the next year or two.

I have had conversations with a profeesor at The University of North Carolina who said that they had no luck in trying to grow Sorbus species. I live on the Cumberland Plateau in East Tennessee. The trees are plante... read more