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Thunberg Spirea, Thunberg's Meadowsweet

Spiraea thunbergii

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Spiraea (spy-REE-ah) (Info)
Species: thunbergii (thun-BERG-ee-eye) (Info)



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun



Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring


Grown for foliage


Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From softwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

By simple layering

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Lansdowne, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:


On Aug 3, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

Even though this spirea like other spireas is very twiggy, the twigginess looks good. This is one of the most fine-textured woody plants. It has never been commonly planted, just occasionally here and there in the Midwest and East of the US. Native to Japan and China, first brought over in the late 18oo's. There are a few yellow foliaged cultivars that have been commonly planted in recent years as 'Mellow Yellow'. Hinsdale Nursery in northeast ILL sells "Mt Fuji' that is a more compact form. To me from landscape evaluation it is nice, not awesome. I don't know of it ever escaping cultivation to become an Asian invasive.