Chinese Lilac
Syringa x chinensis 'Lilac Sunday'

Family: Oleaceae (oh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Syringa (si-RING-gah) (Info)
Species: x chinensis (chi-NEN-sis) (Info)
Cultivar: Lilac Sunday

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Violet/Lavender

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

By grafting

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Forest Falls, California

Milton, Massachusetts

Roslindale, Massachusetts

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 1, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This is an exceptional lilac, introduced in 1997 by the Arnold Arboretum.

It's the equal of any lilac in fragrance, and surpasses any in the apparent size of the inflorescences. Instead of producing a pair of flower clusters at the tip of each twig, it produces a pair at each node within two feet of the tip. So it looks as if each branch terminates in a two-foot-long inflorescence.

The habit is much more graceful than the common lilac. Trunks and branches are more slender and gracefully arching, even willowy, and its winter texture is finer. The leaves are narrower, contributing to the more refined effect. I think they're also a little less inclined to get powdery mildew than those of other lilacs.

If I had room for only one lilac, I would choos... read more