Field pepperweed
Lepidium campestre

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lepidium (lep-PID-ee-um) (Info)
Species: campestre (kam-PES-tree) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Biennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Millersburg, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 14, 2007, Sherlock_Holmes from Rife, PA (Zone 6a) wrote:

Field Pepperweed or Cow Cress is an edible wild plant. The following books attest to this.

The "Edible Wild Plants: A North American Field Guide" by Elias & Dykeman has this to say...

"Harvest: Young shoots and leaves in spring.

Preparation: Another member of the mustard family. Use Cow Cress greens sparingly in salad with less bitter species. As a potherb, boil in 1 to 2 changes of water. Try recipes given for other mustards. Leaves high in vitamins A and C. Peppery seeds can be used to season meats, soups, and salads."

The "Edible Wild Plants: Eastern / Central North America" by Lee Allen Peterson has this to say...

"Use: Salad, cooked green, seasoning. Add the pungent young leaves to salads or boil for... read more