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Campanula Species, Cherry Bells, Spotted Bellflower

Campanula punctata

Family: Campanulaceae (kam-pan-yew-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Campanula (kam-PAN-yoo-luh) (Info)
Species: punctata (punk-TAH-tah) (Info)
Synonym:Campanula nobilis
Synonym:Campanula van-houttei
Synonym:Campanula violifolia

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pink

Rose/Mauve

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mount Prospect, Illinois

Wayne, Illinois

Mount Laurel, New Jersey

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

3
positives
2
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 21, 2015, AliKat32 from Greenfield, NH (Zone 5b) wrote:

I received this plant as a seedling from a fellow DG'er and it has taken two years for it to get big enough to finally bloom. It's an awesome plant here in Zone 5....it's about 12 - 18" tall and is planted in part sun/part shade. I don't water it too much....mostly just natural rainfall patterns. The color is amazing and the plant is full of blooms!

Positive

On Jun 15, 2012, sunshinelaughing from Sunnyvale, CA (Zone 10b) wrote:

Living down on the San Francisco Pennisula, my micro climate has allowed this plant to grow and bloom over 8 months of the year. This is my 4th year with the plant and it is a slow spreader. The blooms are like mini foxglove blooms with their internal spots and long lasting on the plant. It has grown well with a low watering, but consistent 3x a week pattern. It gets maybe 4 hours of full midday sun per day and does not burn or wilt. Definitely one of my favorite Campanulas!

Positive

On Jun 22, 2010, plantswap from Utica, MI wrote:

I RECIEVED THIS PLANT AS A TRADE W/ A NEW NEIGHBOR. IT DID NOT GROW THE FIRST YEAR I HAD I T
BUT THIS YEAR IT TOOK OFF. I HAVE IT IN A MOIST AND SUNNY AREA. MINE HAS GROWN TO ABOUT 4'. IT IS IN FULL BLOOM AND NO PROBLEMS LIKE BUGS OR MOLDS. 06/22/10

Negative

On Nov 17, 2007, kd2000 from toronto,
Canada wrote:

This plant has done really well in an open woodland garden where it can spread at will and compete with the weeds. However, in my perennial beds it has become invasive and proving a challenge to eradicate, it self sows freely and requires careful dead heading to control.

Neutral

On Nov 30, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

Spreads freely by both rhizomes and self-seeding under optimum growing conditions. Can be invasive.

No serious insect or disease problems. Low maintenance flower.

Neutral

On Jan 3, 2002, poppysue from Westbrook, ME (Zone 5a) wrote:

Campamula punctata has arching stems that grow 1 - 2 feet tall. Nodding tubular flowers ranging from white to lilac or pink are born in early summer. Flowers are spotted inside with dark red or purple. C. punctata is very similar to c.takesimana in appearance. This plant is an aggressive spreader - both by seeds and underground roots. Plant it where it won't interfere with its neighbors.

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