Ornamental Clover, Red Feather Clover
Trifolium rubens

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Trifolium (try-FOH-lee-um) (Info)
Species: rubens (ROO-benz) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Magenta (Pink-Purple)

Red

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Blue-Green

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Belton, Missouri

Saint Louis, Missouri

Hillsdale, New York

Norristown, Pennsylvania

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Dallas, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 11, 2012, Get_growing from Dallas, TX wrote:

Very pretty bloom early to mid spring here. Mine get a bit of shade, but some late afternoon sun. Two of three new plants survived hottest summer despite near complete neglect. Don't think will be invasive in North Texas.