Kotukutuku, Tree Fuchsia
Fuchsia excorticata

Family: Onagraceae (on-uh-GRAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Fuchsia (FEW-she-uh) (Info)
Species: excorticata (eks-kor-tee-KAT-uh) (Info)
» View all varieties of Fuchsias

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Red

Green

Purple

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

1
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0
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RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 16, 2013, RosinaBloom from Waihi
New Zealand (Zone 1) wrote:

Fuchsia excorticata - a New Zealand native - is the largest fuchsia in the world, growing to tree size upwards of 13 metres with a trunk to 0.6 metres in diameter. It is found commonly throughout New Zealand, and is easily recognised by its bark which peels and hangs in red papery strips to show a pale bark underneath. The introduction of Common Brushtail Possum to New Zealand has precipitated a serious decline in this species where large concentrations of the possum are present. It appears to be one of the possum's preferred food sources which they browse individual trees to the point of defoliation and the trees die.

The berry is sweet and juicy, and was used by European settlers to make jam and puddings. Tui and Wood Pigeon feed on the berries which have lots of very ti... read more