Viburnum
Viburnum 'Chesapeake'

Family: Adoxaceae (a-dox-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Viburnum (vy-BUR-num) (Info)
Cultivar: Chesapeake
Hybridized by Egolf
Registered or introduced: 1962
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Evergreen

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Shawnee Mission, Kansas

Clermont, Kentucky

Georgetown, Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

Silver Spring, Maryland

Crosswicks, New Jersey

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Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 14, 2008, cloverlymd from Silver Spring, MD wrote:

This is my favorite of the fragrant viburnums. The scent lacks the unpleasant edge that I at least smell in V. xburkwoodii. The one issue I've had with it is that for some reason it attracts browsing damage-- I suspect by rabbits.

Positive

On Jan 2, 2006, ViburnumValley from Scott County, KY (Zone 5b) wrote:

'Chesapeake' is another in the US National Arboretum viburnum group released by the late Dr. Donald Egolf. A handsome evergreen shrub, it gets bigger than its listing here, reaching 6' in my garden relatively quickly (and I've seen it over 8'x10' at the local arboretum on an old plant). The white flowers are not heavily fragrant but quite numerous, and with a pollinator nearby this plant will bear red fruit that turn black. The smooth foliage with a slight twist to the leaf is the distinction from other related evergreen viburnums. It has been killed back with severe zone 5 temperatures (-20F and below), but I think it's a star for milder zone 6 and warmer.