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PlantFiles: Littleleaf Linden
Tilia cordata 'Green Globe'

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Family: Malvaceae (mal-VAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tilia (TIL-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: cordata (kor-DAY-tuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Green Globe

Synonym:Tilia parvifolia

Category:
Trees

Height:
12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:
10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)
USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)
USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)
USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:
Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:
Deciduous

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:
Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:
Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:
Unknown - Tell us

Profile:

No positives
2 neutrals
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Neutral coriaceous On Mar 6, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

There are many cultivars of this species. To my eye, they're nearly all much alike. This one is distinctly different in being a dwarf. The rest of my comments concern the species:

This adaptable and pollution-tolerant species is commonly planted as a shade tree.

The June flowers are not showy but perfume the air for about two weeks, and are very attractive to honeybees and other pollinators. The French traditionally use them dried as an herbal tea. The pollen is moderately allergenic.

This tree is easy to shape and takes well to shearing and pollarding. For centuries, it has been popular in Europe for estates, parks, and allees, and also commonly used there as a hedge.

In Europe, mature trees can reach 80-90'. I rarely see it reach half that here in Massachusetts.

In Boston, this tree is commonly afflicted with aphids or scale, which excrete a rain of sticky honeydew on everything below, including benches and windshields. The fallen honeydew usually turns black with sooty mold. Systemic insecticides can be used to control the insects but also take a toll on honeybees and other pollinators.

This species also commonly produces tremendous numbers of suckers from the base of the trunk, requiring frequent maintenance and eventually producing large disfiguring burls.

This is one of the most commonly planted street trees in the northeast. I see many here that are stunted and half-dead. Perhaps it's the stingy tree pits they're given.

According to Dirr, this species suffers in the hot summers of southeastern US. It does better there with protection from afternoon sun. It rarely prospers south of Z7.

Neutral smiln32 On Dec 3, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

This tree is a dwarf version of the larger cultivars. It is usually grafted onto rootstock. It grows to a height of 15'. The leaves grow in a compact habit and it makes for a nice specimen plant. It does not do well in tightly compacted soils, such as clay. It tolerates dry conditions and does not like to be overwatered. It prefers well-drained soil. It grows at a medium rate. The only real pest that does any damage is the Japanese beetle. They defoliate the trees quite rapidly.



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