Chinese Scullcap, Baikal Skullcap, Golden Root, Helmet Flower
Scutellaria baicalensis

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Scutellaria (skew-teh-LARE-ee) (Info)
Species: baicalensis (by-kol-EN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Scutellaria lanceolaria
Synonym:Scutellaria macrantha

Category:

Herbs

Perennials

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Blue-Violet

Violet/Lavender

Purple

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Blue-Green

Chartreuse/Yellow

Aromatic

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By simple layering

By tip layering

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Denver, Colorado

Cape Coral, Florida

Deland, Florida

Wauchula, Florida

Rincon, Georgia

Greenville, Indiana

Houston, Texas

Rowlett, Texas

Leesburg, Virginia

Kennewick, Washington

Stanwood, Washington

Great Cacapon, West Virginia

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 23, 2009, plutodrive from Denver, CO (Zone 5b) wrote:

This plant is drought tolerant and suitable for xeriscaping.

Positive

On Jan 9, 2008, LeBug from Greenville, IN (Zone 6a) wrote:

I love my skullcap, Ive had it in a part sun herb garden for at least four years now and it has grown to 3 around only about a foot high, covered with dark purple orchid like flowers the hummers go from one to the other spending a lot of time making sure they hit every one of them! Im trying some new ones this year, mine doesnt require a lot of water very drought tolerant even with the drought we had last year (2007), I have the hard clay soil and it does very well.

Neutral

On Dec 19, 2004, NatureWalker from New York & Terrell, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

A perennial herb from the mint family with many small blue-purple flowers on woody stems in the second year.
Start seeds indoors in late February or early March at 1/4 inch depth.
Soil temperature should be at 50-60 degrees.
Transplant into garden when seedlings are 4-6 inches tall, and all danger of frost has past.
Plant in full sun, in well drained soil.

Watering: During germination, keep the entire starter-bed evenly moist by misting/spraying.
Keep plant well-watered through maturity, allowing soil surface to dry between waterings.

The Chinese have used this valuable plant as a medicinal herb for over 2,000 years, it is very versatile.
Plants must be 3-4 years of age to be used medicinally.
Harvest mature ro... read more