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Chinese Scullcap, Baikal Skullcap, Golden Root, Helmet Flower
Scutellaria baicalensis

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Scutellaria (skew-teh-LARE-ee) (Info)
Species: baicalensis (by-kol-EN-sis) (Info)
Synonym:Scutellaria lanceolaria
Synonym:Scutellaria macrantha

Category:

Herbs

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Chartreuse/Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Blue-Violet

Violet/Lavender

Purple

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Aromatic

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By simple layering

By tip layering

By stooling or mound layering

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Denver, Colorado

Cape Coral, Florida

Deland, Florida

Wauchula, Florida

Rincon, Georgia

Greenville, Indiana

Houston, Texas

Rowlett, Texas

Leesburg, Virginia

Kennewick, Washington

Stanwood, Washington

Great Cacapon, West Virginia

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 23, 2009, plutodrive from Denver, CO (Zone 5b) wrote:

This plant is drought tolerant and suitable for xeriscaping.

Positive

On Jan 9, 2008, LeBug from Greenville, IN (Zone 6a) wrote:

I love my skullcap, Ive had it in a part sun herb garden for at least four years now and it has grown to 3 around only about a foot high, covered with dark purple orchid like flowers the hummers go from one to the other spending a lot of time making sure they hit every one of them! Im trying some new ones this year, mine doesnt require a lot of water very drought tolerant even with the drought we had last year (2007), I have the hard clay soil and it does very well.

Neutral

On Dec 19, 2004, NatureWalker from New York & Terrell, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

A perennial herb from the mint family with many small blue-purple flowers on woody stems in the second year.
Start seeds indoors in late February or early March at 1/4 inch depth.
Soil temperature should be at 50-60 degrees.
Transplant into garden when seedlings are 4-6 inches tall, and all danger of frost has past.
Plant in full sun, in well drained soil.

Watering: During germination, keep the entire starter-bed evenly moist by misting/spraying.
Keep plant well-watered through maturity, allowing soil surface to dry between waterings.

The Chinese have used this valuable plant as a medicinal herb for over 2,000 years, it is very versatile.
Plants must be 3-4 years of age to be used medicinally.
Harvest mature ro... read more