Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum 'Whipper Snapper'

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lycopersicon (ly-koh-PER-see-kon) (Info)
Species: lycopersicum (ly-koh-PER-see-kum) (Info)
Cultivar: Whipper Snapper
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Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Ferment seeds before storing

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Growing Habit:

Determinate

Fruit Shape:

Cherry

Fruit Size:

Small (grape/cherry varieties)

Days to Maturity:

Early (55-68 days)

Fruit Colors:

Pink

Seed Type:

Open-pollinated

Usage:

Fresh, salad

Disease Resistance:

Unknown - Tell us

Leaf Type:

Regular Leaf

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mountainair, New Mexico

Newark Valley, New York

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 26, 2009, rbrown974 from Newark Valley, NY wrote:

I tried Whippersnapper because a grower in Fairbanks, Alaska (permafrost country) said in an Internet forum that Whippersnapper was always the first to bear fruit. Aha! Input from a real gardener, not hype from a seed catalog! Itís a cherry; it takes 67 to make a pound. The plants sprawl on the ground. Of the 9 varieties I grew in 2007, Whippersnapper was the most susceptible to sunscald. Hardening off is therefore very important. I grow it as a season-extender on the front end of the season. It does produce red tomatoes ahead of anything else; 3 weeks ahead of Rutgers.

Neutral

On Dec 27, 2004, Big_Red from Bethelridge, KY (Zone 6a) wrote:

"Extremely early, dark pink oblong shaped cherries grow in low lying sprays."