Angel Trumpet, Angel's Trumpet
Brugmansia sanguinea

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brugmansia (broog-MAN-zee-ah) (Info)
Species: sanguinea (san-GWIN-ee-a) (Info)
Synonym:Brugmansia lutea
» View all varieties of Brugmansias
View this plant in a garden

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Red

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Foliage Color:

Bronze-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Huntsville, Alabama

Alameda, California

American Canyon, California

Arden-arcade, California

Chula Vista, California

Clayton, California

Goleta, California

Hayward, California

Mission Viejo, California

Richmond, California

San Anselmo, California

San Jose, California

San Leandro, California

Santa Cruz, California

Sonoma, California

Washington, District Of Columbia

Port Saint Lucie, Florida

Decatur, Georgia

Roswell, Georgia

Channahon, Illinois

Cumberland, Maryland

Flowood, Mississippi

Las Vegas, Nevada

Cary, North Carolina

Coos Bay, Oregon

Fair Play, South Carolina

Conroe, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

12
positives
3
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 21, 2015, asneekyninja from Mazomanie, WI wrote:

Living in Wisconsin I know this needs to be a potted plant, I've read its fussy about heat but wants a pile of humidity.. Luckily we have both.. Ive gotten the thing about 6 inches tall.. pretty little thing.. difficult to avoid root rot!!

Positive

On Nov 25, 2014, Coquinet from Spring Valley, CA wrote:

Like IslandJim I discovered this beautiful plant at Fort Ross, California. In a ravine leading down to the ocean it grew in abundance with fuschias, thick and green, with dozens if not hundreds of hummingbirds gathering nectar. I collected seed pods and raised in the warm, eastern Bay Area, CA where they grew about 6 ft tall, and bloomed nicely, but would freeze off many years down to the roots, coming back the next year. Never got very big, and finally lost them. Please be forewarned, the naturally occuring alkaloids in this plant, if ingested in lower doses, produce powerful, concrete hallucinations (feel completely real). Also results in slowed brain function for many years. A slightly higher dose is fatal. See Carlos Castenada's books for similar warnings, same chemicals, even in the f... read more

Neutral

On Dec 14, 2013, Itrme from Limmen
Netherlands wrote:

Have several hybrids grown from seeds, as far a I can tell. only 4 of 12 plants had enough growth potential. 3 of 4 produced buds of which only 2 actually flowered in autumn. 2 out of 4 had the undesirable qualities:
- Prone to over watering (Pot needs to be allowed to almost completely dry up, failing to do so might result in stem rot)
- Prone to pests as thrips, white fly and lice

One of the 2 flowering plants lacked the above traits but was much more compact in foliage.

I still have 2 smaller plants, which did not grow tall enough to flower because of the placement of the pots and size of said pots. These 2 did not suffer from over watering even though they did receive ample of water. The difference is the potting soil. For these 2 plants I ha... read more

Positive

On Nov 8, 2012, baiissatva from Dunedin
New Zealand wrote:

Coastal Otago, New Zealand.

I have to disagree with the zonal rating on this plant. It is a mountain species and grows here, in the ground and outdoors (medium zone 9) where we get snow, hail, and some frost plus quite a difference in day length throughout the year. Like a weed! Mine is already over a metre high and down the road there are some 3-4 metres square. Because of it's soft herbaceous structure it appreciates shelter from the worst of the wind etc, and ceases flowering for a short time through winter, but flowers madly for the rest of the year and requires absolutely zero care.

From what I can see, it's consistently high temps that are its major enemy in many places, causing it to abort flowering and decline. North of here it does not seem so wi... read more

Positive

On Jun 9, 2011, dmgg711 from Las Vegas, NV wrote:

I ordered this plant via a catalog which I received 15 plants in 1998. I planted 2 and gave the rest to my neighbors. I planted these on each side of my porch facing north. They grew and gave orange trumpet flowers galore and hummingbirds visited daily. I live in a desert environment and summer heat up to 120 degrees. It would go down to the ground in the winter and come back in the spring and grow over my porch by summer.

We moved in 2001 and I have not planted another creeper but intend to plant a red and yellow creeper in the next few weeks. I miss the beautiful color and want my hummingbirds to feed on the trumpet flowers along with their sugared water feeders.

Positive

On Jun 6, 2011, cabngirl from Sonoma, CA wrote:

I'm in Sonoma, CA Zone 9 and have had this plant in my gardens for almost 20 years. I have a potted specimen I drag under the patio to preserve in case of extreme weather and some in the ground. It's suffered die-backs from freezes and some issues with white fly/aphids (only where it's unhappy/struggling), and tends to wilt in full sun/heat but always comes back. I've had trouble getting bloom with the cold season hitting hard about the time the bloom cycle comes on. Here in the valley it's a question of finding a protected spot. Where I lived previously across the valley we enjoyed a milder micro-niche and a big tree that offered nice protection and filtered light and I used to get beautiful bloom there. Easy to propagate in my experience- just stuffed occasional trimmings where ever was... read more

Positive

On Jun 6, 2011, henrimonet from Cary, NC wrote:

I live in Piedmont North Carolina (Raleigh area) and have found this plant to be somewhat invasive but not uncontrollable. When I first found it growing naturally among my Verbena I dug out the 'main' plant and placed it in a 20-inch pot with trellis in my morning garden. It has responded by growing to about five-feet in height and filling out wonderfully with foliage, but only few orange-red flowers--although those few have attracted numerous visits from the resident hummingbirds and Monarchs. Not much success in propagating from seed or stem cuttings but have found it quite easy to grow from root sections. It dies back to the ground here after the first hard freeze, however the first few warm days of spring bring it back to life.

Neutral

On Mar 14, 2011, jaythestingray from Jackson, MS wrote:

Everyone please note that the 1 negative post on this plant is from an individual that has little experience with it. I always hate when people post like that on here. "I bought this plant and it died so I give it a negative." One should have substantial growing experience before the post negatively. Just give it a neutral instead.

Positive

On Jun 21, 2010, railroadpugs from Lincolnton, NC wrote:

I HAVE SEVERAL ANGEL TRUMPETS GROWING HERE IN ZONE 7 NORTH CAROLINA UP AGAINST THE SOUTH FACING BRICK WALL OF MY HOUSE THAT GETS ABOUT 4 HOURS OF SUN EACH DAY..THEY GROW TO ABOUT 8 FEET TALL AND BLOOM HEAVILY AND THE SMELL IN THE EVENING IS FANTASTIC..THEY DO DIE BACK IN THE WINTER LIKE A HIBISCUS PLANT, SO I CUT THEM BACK EACH SPRING AND THE HEAT OFF THE BRICK WALL KEEPS THE ROOTS FROM DYING IN THE WINTER WITH TEMPS DOWN TO THE 20'S THE LAST 2 YEARS WE HAVE SEEN TEMPS GO TO 9 DEGREES AND THEY COME BACK JUST AS STRONG AS THE YEAR BEFORE..WE GET TEMPS IN THE 90'S AND ABOVE WITH GOD AWFUL HUMIDITY AND IT DOES NOT BOTHER THE PLANTS AT ALL..JAPANESE BEETLES WILL CHEW ON THEM A BIT BUT NOT ENOUGH TO DAMAGE THEM...

Positive

On Apr 19, 2010, terrora wrote:

I am happy to say I have sprouts coming up in a large pot of these beauties. It will get the morning sun on my patio step. Will see if I can keep it potted and shape. I potted some more seed for my sis in law. Hopefully, they will sprout before her annual visit. I will keep you posted, oh I potted them in regular potting soil. In a pot that waters from the bottom.

Positive

On Feb 18, 2010, Ravens444 from Mission Viejo, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

Grows in my yard in 9B... I believe it is too hot in summer for this plant. Looks fine during winter. Has not bloomed for me ever.

Positive

On May 5, 2009, MTVineman from Helena, MT (Zone 5a) wrote:

For me, this is probably the easiest Brug to grow. I have no idea why since it is usually listed as somewhat difficult to grow and propagate. Guess I must be doing something right because my sanguinea is huge and extremely healthy looking. I am located in Helena, Montana so obviously this cannot be grown outside in our climate except during the summer months and it does love going outside at that time. Maybe thats why it does so well. Our summers are pretty hot but it does cool down at night and it also usually rains every afternoon around 5 or 6 pm so the humidity can get fairly high too. The sanguinea seems to love this weather and will put on a real show. During the winter months, I simply keep it in a bright window and it does fine, although it kind of goes into hibernation until sprin... read more

Positive

On Jun 25, 2005, StarGazey26 from (Zone 10a) wrote:

I love this plant, i live in a place just right for it to grow and flourish.. It has grown a few feet tall and is about 4 feet tall and about 4 feet wide, it was in a five gallon when i bought it last year.. Here we dont get hot summers, about 76 everyday, and in the winter, it really doesnt freeze, so this brug did great, it is in the ground, and is just growing and blooming like crazy!! In the winter it looks good, and i am very lucky that i am able to grow this brug here!!

Negative

On May 19, 2004, ambest from Riverside, CA wrote:

I have one of these, poor thing has been in the ground for 2 yrs, practically no leaves, but it does get an occasional flower. I plan on potting it, moving it to partial shade or filtered sun and cutting it back. will keep you posted.

Positive

On Oct 18, 2003, IslandJim from Keizer, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

I was pleasantly surprised to find this plant growing "wild" in a ravine above the ocean at Fort Ross, California

Neutral

On Apr 9, 2001, MsBatt from Florence, AL (Zone 7a) wrote:

There are five species of Brugmansia, and nine or more species of the closely-related and often-confused Datura. Brugs are woody perennials, often reaching six to eight feet in a growing season, and where hardy can mature to twenty feet or more. They bear long (eight to twenty or more inches) trumpet-shaped blooms, usually flaring at the end. Most all are highly fragrant. They flower in white, cream, yellow thru orange, and pink thru peach. They can be grown in-ground or potted, but cannot tolerate freezing. A light frost can damage leaves and buds; a hard frost can kill back to the ground. If the ground freezes, even the roots die. Some may be root-hardy if cut down and heavily mulched, but I have not succeeded with this here in Zone 7A, although some people in my area have. Some species,... read more