Freesia
Freesia 'Single Mix'

Family: Iridaceae (eye-rid-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Freesia (FREE-see-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Single Mix

Category:

Bulbs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Pink

Red

Orange

Red-Orange

Bright Yellow

Light Blue

Violet/Lavender

White/Near White

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Scottsdale, Arizona

Fresno, California

Sacramento, California

San Diego, California

Miami, Florida

Savannah, Georgia

Dunmor, Kentucky

New Orleans, Louisiana

Florence, Mississippi

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Eagle Pass, Texas

Kalama, Washington

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 30, 2009, neworleansdude from New Orleans, LA (Zone 9b) wrote:

I had never grown bulbs before this year and of the types tried: hiacynth, muscari, crocus, iris, and freesia, the freesia and muscari were by far the best in a 9b high annual rainfall zone (one of our rainest months is February, but then March and April not so much). I had the best luck with the six I planted together in a large pot in December that sat on a porch with only 6 or so hours of light. The ones in the ground did alright, but those were in direct light and I think it got too hot for them (we've been having temps. of over 80f the last two weeks now). So for the most part, most of them bloomed for the month of April. I don't know if they're going to come back next year. I would say if you can find them on sale or at a good price they are worth trying out.

Neutral

On Jun 15, 2008, goofybulb from (Zone 5b) wrote:

Though you can have flowers and keep them from one year to another, they are not happy in Miami. Probably the combination heat-moisture makes them grow leggy and "spineless", you have to prop them or else they fall to the ground; the ones that fall, will not flower that season.
What a pity, such beautiful flowers and so enchanting fragrance, but not suited for a South Florida garden!