Ichang Papeda
Citrus ichangensis

Family: Rutaceae (roo-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Citrus (SIT-rus) (Info)
Species: ichangensis (ee-CHAN-gen-sis) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

By grafting

By budding

Seed Collecting:

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Anniston, Alabama

Sarasota, Florida

Augusta, Georgia

Carrboro, North Carolina

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 26, 2009, gooley from Hawthorne, FL (Zone 8b) wrote:

I haven't grown this plant. I'm told that it is much hardier than indicated here: zone 7a? 6b? It's perhaps the hardiest species of the genus Citrus. Might make a good marmalade or candied peel, and possibly the leaves could be used as a substitute for those of kaffir lime in cooking: most citrus leaves can be, but this species is classified as being in the same sub-genus as kaffir lime.

Positive

On Feb 12, 2005, seaspur from Sarasota, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

Planted small tree 1997 in part-sun, part-shade location, very sandy soil, under fertilized. Some light fruiting each year. But this year over 30 fruits on a seven-foot tree. Looked like a Christmas tree with large capped yellow balls. Thick rind, very little almost dry pulp, large seeds.