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PlantFiles: Austrian Pine, Black Pine, European Black Pine
Pinus nigra

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Family: Pinaceae (py-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pinus (PY-nus) (Info)
Species: nigra (NY-gruh) (Info)

3 vendors have this plant for sale.

One member has or wants this plant for trade.

Category:
Trees
Conifers

Height:
over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:
20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:
Pale Yellow

Bloom Time:
Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:
Evergreen

Other details:
This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater
This plant is resistant to deer
Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:
4.6 to 5.0 (highly acidic)
5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:
Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds
Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

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There are a total of 25 photos.
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Profile:

5 positives
1 neutral
1 negative

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Neutral Rickwebb On Jan 23, 2014, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

It is a handsome coniferous tree. It is the most commonly planted pine from many nurseries in much of the Midwest where the soil is alkaline as northern and central Illinois. It is also commonly planted in the East. It tolerates pollution, salt, and heavy clay soil. Its very dark, thick, about 6" long needles are very stiff and are painful when poked by them. The bark becomes plated with tan areas among the gray- brown bark It grows about 1.5 ft/yr like most conifer trees. Trees often suffer some damage from Sphaeropsis Tip Blight and some die from it. I prefer the similar American native of Red Pine that has soft needles and prettier bark with some orange and pink areas among the gray bark. But the latter is not for alkaline and heavy clay soils or lots of salt and pollution.

Positive marktrot1 On Dec 29, 2011, marktrot1 from Flagstaff, AZ wrote:

This is a great complementary pine in the high country of the southwest (Flagstaff). After a year or two of irrigation it needs no supplemental watering and has a similar green as the Ponderosa, but grows thicker with a more obvious central leader. The Austrian Pine seems to like clay more than Ponderosa as well.

Positive Pinyon On Jan 23, 2009, Pinyon from Prescott, AZ (Zone 7a) wrote:

This pine is EXTREMELY hardy and tolerant of different climates. I've seen them successfully thriving from Minnesota all the way down to Tuscon (where 100+ degree temperatures are very normal in summer). It's almost as if these things can grow anywhere. If you're a beginner to gardening, I'd recommend this tree since it seems like It'd grow in any condition just fine as long as you water it.

Negative bigcityal On Apr 19, 2008, bigcityal from Menasha, WI (Zone 5a) wrote:

I have seen a few nice examples of these trees, but overall they are the most prone of all evergreens to insects and disease in this area. Very often used as ornamental trees in poor/wet sites they require treatment to keep them looking acceptable.

Positive TBGDN On Mar 27, 2006, TBGDN from Macy, IN wrote:

Pinus nigra, or Austrian pine, is native to western Europe. Introduced to this country in the mid-1800's, it has been planted extensively as an ornamental and conservation plant. In some areas, Austrian pine grows to a height of 30 to 50 feet with a spread of 20 to 25 feet. On most soils, growth rate is usually 12 to 18 inches per year, and to me I consider this rapid growth. Young trees are pyramidal in shape, but become oval with age and, on some sites, flat topped. Noted for its dark, rich green foliage, Austrian pine provides a nice contrast with other plants. Austrian pine needles are stiff, usually straight, 2 to 4 inches long and are in groups of 2. Needles can stay on the trees for 2 to 3 years. Oval shaped cones are 2 to 3 inch long. The cone scales do not have prickles. The bark has dark furrows with gray or gray-brown mottled ridges. Winter buds have a distinct silver color. Common insect pests include spider mites and pine needle scale. Common diseases include Dothistroma (needle blight) and Sphaeropsis (Diplodia) tip blight. More information can be researched at the Kansas Forest Service web site.

I began several years ago with three small bare root plants of about 12". All grew beautifully for 10-15 years when two developed needle blight and died after a year when almost 16-18' in height. This was devastating, however, I had saved and transplanted two very tiny seedlings from one of the dead trees a few years before, and today they are growing beautifully, and one is almost the height of the seed parent! So in total I lost two, but they gave me two replacements.

Positive melody On Jan 27, 2005, melody from Benton, KY (Zone 7a) wrote:

A beautiful pine with dark green needles 3" to 6" long. cones are 2" to 3" and somewhat pointed, without stalks and dropping from the tree early.

Mature trunks have a distinctive grayish yellow bark with vertical plates.

Very common in Northern landscaped parks, and they sometimes spread from cultivation.

Positive spklatt On Jan 3, 2005, spklatt from Ottawa, ON (Zone 5a) wrote:

Austrian pine is reported to not fare as well in zones 7 & 8 as it does in colder climates. From personal experience, it thrives in zone 5a, unfazed by heavy snow, freezing rain, road salt...and even the occasional summer! It can spread to 20-40', so is best in a a large yard. Beautiful tree; Recommended.

Regional...

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,
Flagstaff, Arizona
Prescott, Arizona
Brighton, Colorado
Chicago, Illinois
Glen Ellyn, Illinois
Macy, Indiana
West Friendship, Maryland
Houghton, Michigan
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Two Harbors, Minnesota
Piedmont, Missouri
Lincoln, Nebraska
Silver Springs, Nevada
Ringwood, New Jersey
Columbus, Ohio
Middletown, Ohio
Bend, Oregon
Downingtown, Pennsylvania
Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania
San Antonio, Texas
Orem, Utah
De Pere, Wisconsin
Menasha, Wisconsin



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