Coastal Plain Joe-Pye Weed, Eastern Joe Pye Weed 'Little Joe'

Eutrochium dubium

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Eutrochium (yoo-TRO-kee-um) (Info)
Species: dubium (DOO-bee-um) (Info)
Cultivar: Little Joe
Additional cultivar information:(PP16122)
Hybridized by Palmer
Registered or introduced: 2003
Synonym:Eupatorium dubium

Category:

Herbs

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Violet/Lavender

Purple

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

,

Washington, Illinois

Hebron, Kentucky

Lincoln, Nebraska

Asheville, North Carolina

Cincinnati, Ohio

Woodward, Oklahoma

West Chester, Pennsylvania

Newport News, Virginia

Vancouver, Washington

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Dec 23, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

All the big species have lovely, large flower heads which are very attractive to butterflies and other pollinators.

Unfortunately, the seed-heads tend to look messy rather than ornamental, and begin to detract from the flowering display within a week of the start of flowering. This is especially obvious with the white-flowered cultivars. Cutting back the flower heads in mid-August may trigger rebloom in early fall.

In the Chicago Botanic Garden's 2014 performance evaluation of Eupatoriums/Eutrochiums, this cultivar received five stars out of five, one of four of the 26 taxa in the trial to do so. This was largely due to its exceptional resistance to powdery mildew, which commonly disfigures the big species of this genus. [... read more

Neutral

On Feb 28, 2012, Gabrielle from (Zone 5a) wrote:

Late to emerge in spring. Blooms July-September in my garden. PP #16122

Positive

On Nov 17, 2006, Marilynbeth wrote:

Love it!

The Eastern Cottontails chewed it down , but then it grew back up (sprinkled some cayenne pepper on it to keep them away) and looks beautiful and smells wonderful!

First year growing it.

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